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MANHATTAN GRAPHICS CENTER

250 WEST 40 STREET, 5TH FLOOR
NEW YORK, NY 10018
212-219-8783

THANKS TO FRIENDS OF MGC: 

The Jockey Hollow Foundation  |  The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation | The Scherman Foundation for its generous and continuing support | The Wolf Kahn and Emily Mason Foundation | New York City Department of Cultural Affairs | Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation | Friends and MGC members who have made donations to the Center | New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature | Our programs are supported in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

ARTIST TALKS

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The Personal/Political Work of Käthe Kollwitz
Presented by MGC Member Phyllis Trout
Saturday, November 16 
6:30-8:30 pm
Printmaker and MGC member Phyllis Trout will share her recent museum research in Germany that centered around the personal artistic evolution of the influential artist Käthe Kollwitz (1867–1945). Kollwitz was a highly skilled, inventive printmaker and sculptor who dedicated her full artistic energies to social and pacifist movements as well as a rigorous practice of constant self-reflection in both the studio and her journals. In this talk, Trout will share in-depth insights into Kollwitz’s printmaking process, including the development of iconic prints from state-to-state, her use of various techniques, and excerpts from the artist’s journal.
  
Trout will also discuss the impact that Kollwitz’s time in Italy had on her development as an artist, and the influence of predecessors such as Ernst Barlach, Goya, Rubens and Rembrandt on her potent imagery. 
Trout observes, “Her unflinching and loving observation of the devastating effect war and poverty have on humanity is powerful. Through her work we become intimate with the tragedies of loss and suffering, yet we see hope for endurance through the individuals, particularly women, that she portrays.”
 
Special thanks to Friends Seminary for supporting Trout’s research project.